Breakfast on the Connecticut

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Archive for June, 2012

Opera North Celebrates 30 Years

June 25th, 2012 by donnanandersen

The King and I, Opera North

The King and I, Opera North
August 3, 8, 11, 16 & 17, 2012

The Summer of 2012 will see Opera North celebrating its 30th year filled with magnificent voices, great music and lively theater.  The season is all about three charming operas and one classic American musical.

The Elixir of Love, Donizetti
Nemorino is head over heels in love with Adina.  He will try anything to make her return his affection, including spending his last dollar on a love potion.  The comedy will be sung in Italian with English subtitles.

The King and I, Rogers and Hammerstein
Anna Leonowens, an English schoolteacher sent to Siam to teach the children in the royal palace, clashes with their father, the King.  Together they find themselves bound by a love that neither is able to express.

The Impresario, Mozart
This is a hilarious opera about the classic conflict between singers and the theater manager who must cast them.

The Cunning Little Vixen, Janacek
This is a touching tale of the cycle of life in a European forest with characters as varied as the forest itself.

Tickets are on sale now at www.operanorth.org or by calling the Lebanon Opera House at 603-448-0400.  Make it a date night out with a dinner, a show and a stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut serving a wonderful breakfast the next morning.

 

Quinatucquet, The Great River

June 13th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Canoeing on the Connecticut River

Canoeing on the Connecticut River, "The Nile of New England"

Quinatucquet is a Native American word meaning “at the long estuary” and given to a body of water known as “the Nile of New England”.  Breakfast on the Connecticut sits on the banks of this river also the longest river in New England.  Yes, it is the Connecticut River flowing over 360 miles from the Canadian border to Long Island Sound.  Once described by the New York Times as ” the Nation’s best landscaped sewer”, the Connecticut River, through the passage of the Clean Water Act and the investment of millions of dollars from government and the private sector, has been reclaimed for our nation to explore and, better still, play in.  Along its banks there are large archeological sites, including one in Claremont NH settled by Native Americans around 800 AD.  There are ten bridges that traverse the Connecticut that are registered with the National Register of Historic Places including the Cornish-Windsor Bridge, the longest covered bridge in the United States.  About 20 miles after the Cornish-Windsor covered bridge you can glide by the Fort at #4 in Charlestown, NH where on an August morning in 1754 a band of Indians broke into the home of Captain James Johnson and took captive the Captain, his 24-year old pregnant wife and their three children, ages 6, 4 & 2 and set off on a trek to Canada.   The reclaimed Connecticut has once again become the life-line for commerce, agriculture, industry as well as energy production, irrigation, manufacturing and multiple recreational uses.  Ninety-nine cities, towns & villages border its length.  Thirty-five colleges and universities on its banks provide an unprecedented representation of higher learning.  Agriculture is still at work on 11% of the Connecticut’s land providing a ready source of locally grown foods.  You can swim – cross the Connecticut from bank to bank in many places and you have swum from NH to VT – fish and boat, best done by canoe, kayak or pontoon.  The Connecticut River and the Valley is one of the last water places that is still underdeveloped and wildly beautiful.  So come spend some time at Breakfast on the Connecticut, take a canoe out in the morning fog and experience the “mighty Connecticut, the first of America’s great rivers and in many ways the last.”