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Archive for February, 2013

NH Maple Weekend 2013, March 23 & 24

February 23rd, 2013 by donnanandersen

Currier and Ives Maple Sugaring

Currier and Ives Maple Sugaring

Celebrate the sweetest season of the year in New Hampshire on March 23 & 24, 2013 when New Hampshire’s working sugarhouses will open their doors to the public.  Even if you know how maple syrup is made – from tapping the sugar maples to boiling sap in an evaporator over a roaring hot fire – it is still a treat to visit a working sugarhouse and learn more about the process and meet the families who carry on this spring tradition every year.  More than 100 sugarhouses, across the state, will open their doors so that you can watch and sample their incredible products.  From different grades of syrup to melt-in-your-mouth maple candy, you will find the best and purest NH maple products at all these establishments.  We are lucky to have at least two working sugarhouses no more than 15 minutes away – Sunday Mountain Maple Farm and Mt. Cube Farm.  Most of the area’s eateries will have at least one menu item that will feature NH maple syrup and Breakfast on the Connecticut will join in as we feature Apple Cheddar Breakfast Bread Pudding with warm maple syrup.  So come and enjoy Maple Weekend in NH, stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, visit a sugarhouse and sample the first harbinger of spring.

Let It Snow – Storm Nemo 2013

February 13th, 2013 by donnanandersen

Snow Roller Used to Pack Snow to Make Roads Passable by Sleigh

Snow Roller Used to Pack Snow to Make Roads Passable by Sleigh  1850 – 1920

The entire northeast was just hit by Storm Nemo, a “Noreaster” that in some parts of Connecticut left 40 inches of new snow on the ground.  Travel became impossible and people stayed put in their homes waiting for the clean-up.  The pubic works departments were on the roads and within 24 hours after the storm, traffic, at least on the Interstates, could move again.  But if it is the late 1800s what do you do to make travel possible after snow has fallen?  You use a horse-drawn snow roller.  They were not standardize in size – they were as big or as small as their builder decided to make them. Some are four feet in diameter and have one drum, others are six feet (or more) in diameter and have two drums that are side-by-side. Some have an implement seat on a post for the driver, while others have a buckboard-type seat and/or a full-width platform on top. Some have a rear-mounted scraper that dresses the freshly-rolled snow. In short, a snow roller was as unique as the individual who constructed it.  They were pulled by teams of horses and used to pack down the snow so that people could travel by sleigh.  Their heyday was between 1850 – 1920 until gasoline powered trucks came into common use.  But I bet they were used in some remote places until the 1940s.   Lots of snow fell with Storm Nemo – enough to make a snow roller pretty ineffective!  But the snow did make all the ski areas, both downhill and cross-country, very happy.  Come north to New Hampshire, stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, and play in the snow!