Breakfast on the Connecticut

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Archive for the ‘Inn Activities’ Category

Gone Fishing!

May 7th, 2014 by donnanandersen

National Fishing and Boating Week  June 1 - June 8, 2014

National Fishing and Boating Week June 1 – June 8, 2014

The incredible Will Rogers said “If all politicians fished instead of speaking publicly, we would be at peace in the world.”  Now expand that to if they fished for a week during National Fishing and Boating Week, June 1 – June 8 when you are able to take your family fishing for FREE with no license required on public bodies of water!  In the words of John Lennon’s song – IMAGINE – the possibility of world peace for a week or just maybe, longer.  For New Hampshire, June 7th is our free fishing day – a perfect opportunity for beginners to try out fishing for the first time.   Breakfast on the Connecticut is right on the Connecticut River – take out one of our canoes and see why so many feel that fishing brings a serenity of the mind.

There Is No Such Thing As A Free Lunch – Or Is There?

March 4th, 2014 by donnanandersen

Enjoying the Connecticut River

Enjoying the Connecticut River

Recently I traveled with my daughter to a conference in Portland, Oregon where she was presenting a paper.  I will leave the plane odyssey for another blog but since I am in the hospitality industry I will comment on the accommodations.  We stayed at the site of the conference which was housed in a major hotel chain.  First item on the agenda – if you wanted WIFI you paid for it!  I could leave the hotel, pop into the Starbucks on the corner and voila, I was connected.  If I wanted a bottle of water – well that was available in my room but at $2.75 per bottle – OUCH!   Breakfast – well that was available at two different locations in the hotel but had to be purchased.  And have you seen the prices of Room Service lately?  A bowl of oatmeal was $11.75 and if you wanted a few berries with that you were charged an additional $2.25.  Renting a car meant that you had to pay for parking.  For years the B&B industry has had a promotion titled A Better Way To Stay.  At most B&Bs access to WIFI is free, beverages are free, breakfast is part of the room charge and in many instances is quite gourmet and parking, well that is free.  In New Hampshire, Breakfast on the Connecticut pays to the state a view tax – the better the view the higher the tax.  Our view of the Connecticut River and the hills of Vermont is free and can be enjoyed for hours while you relax in one of our Adirondack chairs.   Maybe not a free lunch but certainly A Better Way To Stay!

A Quilt Retreat – A Modern Day Sweatshop?

February 16th, 2014 by donnanandersen

1890 Sweatshop in New York

1890 Sweatshop in New York

Quilt Retreat, January 23, 24 & 25, 2014 sponsored by Barnyard Quilting at Breakfast on the Connecticut

Quilt Retreat, January 23, 24 & 25, 2014 sponsored by Barnyard Quilting at Breakfast on the Connecticut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In another century, sweatshops were common in the United States.  Hours were long, working conditions were poor and dangerous and pay was low.   Well, a quilt retreat with 20 women may resemble a sweatshop only in the area of quantity of tools and machinery but that is where the comparison ends.  There are no quotas to be met only those that are self imposed; you can find women working at midnight but that is by choice; the working conditions are light filled and spacious with three terrific meals and snacks all day; and the pay/reward is any number of beautiful creations that will be kept or given away to family and friends.  And you can always take some time off, cross the Connecticut River to Fairlee, Vermont and visit Barnyard Quilting to feed your passion.  I am a quilter and I found the conversation, the quilters, the sharing of techniques and ideas motivational.  I have started to finish those projects that sit by my sewing machine.  It is great way to unwind from my daily routine at Breakfast on the Connecticut.

 

King Bird Sanctuary

March 10th, 2013 by donnanandersen

hanover conservancySince 1961 the Hanover Conservancy has created, maintained and managed a series of trails in the Upper Valley.  Trails such as Balch Hill, Mink Brook and Greensboro Ridge have been enjoyed by so many Upper Valley residents and visitors.  In June 2011, another property came into being – the Nan & Allen King Bird Sanctuary.  The land was once pasture for the Hayes Farm and can be reached by parking at the Etna Library, walking across a field to enter, hiking a mowed trail and coming to rest on a stone bench in the meadow.  You will enjoy a view over the Mink Brook valley while you sit and (if you brought one) eat your picnic lunch.  Make sure you stop to identify crabapple, hawthorn or nannyberry just to mention a few.  We will give you a card with all 8 flowering bushes that are there.  And don’t forget the birds – you may see a Black-and-White Warbler, a Common Yellowthroat or maybe even the seldom seen Wilson’s Warbler.  The days are getting warmer and spring fever will hit and you will want to smell the fresh air and feel the warmth of the spring sun on your face.  Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, have a great breakfast and then take a sandwich and explore the King Bird Sanctuary.  It doesn’t get any better than that!

NH Maple Weekend 2013, March 23 & 24

February 23rd, 2013 by donnanandersen

Currier and Ives Maple Sugaring

Currier and Ives Maple Sugaring

Celebrate the sweetest season of the year in New Hampshire on March 23 & 24, 2013 when New Hampshire’s working sugarhouses will open their doors to the public.  Even if you know how maple syrup is made – from tapping the sugar maples to boiling sap in an evaporator over a roaring hot fire – it is still a treat to visit a working sugarhouse and learn more about the process and meet the families who carry on this spring tradition every year.  More than 100 sugarhouses, across the state, will open their doors so that you can watch and sample their incredible products.  From different grades of syrup to melt-in-your-mouth maple candy, you will find the best and purest NH maple products at all these establishments.  We are lucky to have at least two working sugarhouses no more than 15 minutes away – Sunday Mountain Maple Farm and Mt. Cube Farm.  Most of the area’s eateries will have at least one menu item that will feature NH maple syrup and Breakfast on the Connecticut will join in as we feature Apple Cheddar Breakfast Bread Pudding with warm maple syrup.  So come and enjoy Maple Weekend in NH, stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, visit a sugarhouse and sample the first harbinger of spring.

The Holidays and Keeping Your Pets Safe

December 5th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Wolf

Wolf, Our Dog, In An Earlier Time – She is 19!

The holidays are a time of joy for families and included in your preparations you should eliminate the risk to beloved members of your family, your pets.  In our case, that would be our dogs, Wolf, Pola & Sparky and our cat, Rosie.   Holiday decorations can be a nightmare for your pets especially garland and wrapping ribbon.   Both can get stuck in a pet’s intestines necessitating surgical removal.  If cats gnaw on ribbon it can literally stitch the feline’s intestines together.  How about what your pet eats?  Turkey and ham are usually part of the holiday meal but the bones can be lodged in the intestines.  And rich foods, gravies can cause severe illness.  Many pets can get violently ill from drinking water from the Christmas tree stand – keep your beloved friends from the sap-filled water and heavy, rich treats.  Lastly, poinsettias are toxic to most household pets if they are chewed or swallowed in large enough quantities.  Instead of doing the math on that equation, chose other types of floral arrangements that are safe.  The best holiday gift you can give your pets is a safe and hazard-free environment so they can enjoy all the festivities with you.

If you are traveling with a pet, consider a stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut.  We have two pet-friendly rooms, Room 14 & 15.  We also have 23 acres – plenty of space to walk your dog for exercise.

Quinatucquet, The Great River

June 13th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Canoeing on the Connecticut River

Canoeing on the Connecticut River, "The Nile of New England"

Quinatucquet is a Native American word meaning “at the long estuary” and given to a body of water known as “the Nile of New England”.  Breakfast on the Connecticut sits on the banks of this river also the longest river in New England.  Yes, it is the Connecticut River flowing over 360 miles from the Canadian border to Long Island Sound.  Once described by the New York Times as ” the Nation’s best landscaped sewer”, the Connecticut River, through the passage of the Clean Water Act and the investment of millions of dollars from government and the private sector, has been reclaimed for our nation to explore and, better still, play in.  Along its banks there are large archeological sites, including one in Claremont NH settled by Native Americans around 800 AD.  There are ten bridges that traverse the Connecticut that are registered with the National Register of Historic Places including the Cornish-Windsor Bridge, the longest covered bridge in the United States.  About 20 miles after the Cornish-Windsor covered bridge you can glide by the Fort at #4 in Charlestown, NH where on an August morning in 1754 a band of Indians broke into the home of Captain James Johnson and took captive the Captain, his 24-year old pregnant wife and their three children, ages 6, 4 & 2 and set off on a trek to Canada.   The reclaimed Connecticut has once again become the life-line for commerce, agriculture, industry as well as energy production, irrigation, manufacturing and multiple recreational uses.  Ninety-nine cities, towns & villages border its length.  Thirty-five colleges and universities on its banks provide an unprecedented representation of higher learning.  Agriculture is still at work on 11% of the Connecticut’s land providing a ready source of locally grown foods.  You can swim – cross the Connecticut from bank to bank in many places and you have swum from NH to VT – fish and boat, best done by canoe, kayak or pontoon.  The Connecticut River and the Valley is one of the last water places that is still underdeveloped and wildly beautiful.  So come spend some time at Breakfast on the Connecticut, take a canoe out in the morning fog and experience the “mighty Connecticut, the first of America’s great rivers and in many ways the last.”

New Hampshire Bed and Breakfast Wins TripAdvisor’s Certificate of Excellence

May 26th, 2012 by donnanandersen

TripAdvisor Certificate

Breakfast on the Connecticut Earns The 2012 Certificate of Excellence Award

 

Breakfast on the Connecticut has earned the prestigious TripAdvisor 2012 Certificate of Excellence Award.  The award is given to those properties that consistently are commended by travelers with the highest praise earning a 4.5 rating.  This is the second consecutive year  Breakfast on the Connecticut has received the award.  “Great place to relax!”, “First B&B experience, absolutely wonderful.”, and “Lovely Inn for a relaxing weekend.” are just a few of the remarks by our guests.  Come and spend some time at the only B&B located right on the Connecticut River, America’s first river to be named a US “Blueway”.

Take A Tour Of Lyme Center, NH

May 8th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Lyme Center Academy Building

Lyme Center Adademy Building - Home of the Historical Society

About 7 miles from Breakfast on the Connecticut is the distinctive village of Lyme Center and their historic district.

Start with the Dimick House on Dorchester Road which was mail ordered from Sears in 1924 at a cost of $2,473.  It is a two-story frame and clapboard structure and one of the last houses to use sawn lumber from Sanborn Mill.  Just a note – this is a private home and not open for touring.

Other interesting buildings include the Lyme Center Baptist Church (1830), the Lyme Center Store (1876) and the Lyme Center Academy (1839) that houses the local historical society known as the Lyme Historians.  The museum is open on Tuesday from 9 – noon.  A tour booklet is available for a modest charge from the Lyme Historians.

The Beal House, also on Dorchester Road, has two granite steps with bootscrapers, built into the steps, at the entrance.

Interested in decorative moldings?  Houses on Dorchester Road have cyma recta (double curvature), ovolo (convex hollow round) and cavetto (hollow rounds with an Egyptian influence) all under projecting eaves.

Please take notice of the black locust and sugar maples.  They provide shade for Lyme Center and help to unify this small village.

Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut and explore Lyme Center while on your way to the Dartmouth Skiway, either for hiking, in spring, summer or fall or skiing in the winter.

Find “A Better Way To Stay”!

February 18th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Better Way To Stay (video) Several years ago we visited Mississippi on our annual 2 weeks vacation.  People couldn’t believe that was where we chose to go during our limited time off.  “Mississippi?”  “Why would you want to go there?”  Well, my wife and I love to visit Civil War sites and Mississippi just happens to have a few.  And we’ve discovered that those sites take us to wonderful other places that we might have never seen, and this trip was no different.  Our first stop was Shiloh National Military Park in Tennessee, then across the border to Corinth, Mississippi where the armies battled for control of the rail lines heading east & west and north & south.  We reserved for two nights, but extended to three as there was more to see than we thought.  Next, a half day stop at Brices Crossroads National Battlefield site, then on to Tupelo where we picked up the Natchez Trace Parkway, a beautiful drive with many interesting stops along the way.  Vicksburg National Military Park was next on our radar.  Three days later we were on our way to Grand Gulf military site and Port Gibson, a town that General Grant said was “too beautiful to burn” so he didn’t.  Finally we reached Natchez, a town filled with many beautiful antebellum homes.

Now here is where I get to the point I want to make.  When we travel we like to stay at B&Bs and not because we are B&B owners, but because of what they offer.  So when we went to make our reservations, we were disappointed to find that none had any availability.  What we didn’t know was that the week we chose was Spring Pilgrimage, when many of the homes are open for tours to the public and reservations for rooms are made up to a year ahead of time.  So we had to settle for a national chain during our five-day stay.  Each morning I looked forward to the same breakfast of cold cereal, watered down OJ, store-bought mini muffins, a soggy waffle with make-believe maple syrup and a banana.  The first morning I visited the front desk to inquire about places and interesting things that were “must sees” during our stay  The young lady at the desk told me that, well, she wasn’t from the area so couldn’t help me with my request  She “only” worked in Natchez.  I did  make it a point to go to the desk each morning ,but only to inquire about things she might know.  It was always the same person.  I was never greeted with a smile or a query about whether I was enjoying my stay, or any other nicety  After five days I checked out to a virtual silent transaction, not even a goodbye.  I walked away feeling like a stranger.

When I got home, I did write the headquarters of the chain to express my disappointment with my stay.  I never got a reply.  Who would have thought!  Oh, by the way.  I did get  the information for which I was looking concerning those “must sees”.  I went to one of the B&Bs that I couldn’t get into and the innkeeper was more than happy to assist me with the information and a whole lot more.  He even said goodbye and have a nice stay.

This is the kind of hospitality we try to show at Breakfast on the Connecticut even when cyclists and others stop to use our bathroom or non-guests believe, because of our name, we are licensed to serve breakfast to the public who are not staying here.   B&Bs are a better way to stay – you bet!