Breakfast on the Connecticut

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Archive for the ‘Seasons at the Inn’ Category

Orozco Murals Now A National Historic Landmark

March 27th, 2013 by donnanandersen

Jose Clemente Orozco's The Epic of American Civilization

Jose Clemente Orozco’s The Epic of American Civilization

On March 11, 2013 the Secretary of the Interior designated the Orozco Murals one of 13 new National Historic Landmarks.  National historic landmarks are nationally significant historic places that possess exceptional value or quality in illustrating or interpreting the heritage of the United States.  Jose Clemente Orozco was an srtist in-residence at Dartmouth between 1932 and 1934.  It was during this time he created The Epic of American Civilization, comprised of 24 individual panels or “scenes” that span approximately 3200 square feet.  The Orozco mural is housed in the former reserve corridor of Baker Library now called the Orozco Room.   This is a can’t miss treasure when visiting Dartmouth College.  Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, visit the Orozco exhibit and in your travels don’t forget the Hood Museum.

King Bird Sanctuary

March 10th, 2013 by donnanandersen

hanover conservancySince 1961 the Hanover Conservancy has created, maintained and managed a series of trails in the Upper Valley.  Trails such as Balch Hill, Mink Brook and Greensboro Ridge have been enjoyed by so many Upper Valley residents and visitors.  In June 2011, another property came into being – the Nan & Allen King Bird Sanctuary.  The land was once pasture for the Hayes Farm and can be reached by parking at the Etna Library, walking across a field to enter, hiking a mowed trail and coming to rest on a stone bench in the meadow.  You will enjoy a view over the Mink Brook valley while you sit and (if you brought one) eat your picnic lunch.  Make sure you stop to identify crabapple, hawthorn or nannyberry just to mention a few.  We will give you a card with all 8 flowering bushes that are there.  And don’t forget the birds – you may see a Black-and-White Warbler, a Common Yellowthroat or maybe even the seldom seen Wilson’s Warbler.  The days are getting warmer and spring fever will hit and you will want to smell the fresh air and feel the warmth of the spring sun on your face.  Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, have a great breakfast and then take a sandwich and explore the King Bird Sanctuary.  It doesn’t get any better than that!

NH Maple Weekend 2013, March 23 & 24

February 23rd, 2013 by donnanandersen

Currier and Ives Maple Sugaring

Currier and Ives Maple Sugaring

Celebrate the sweetest season of the year in New Hampshire on March 23 & 24, 2013 when New Hampshire’s working sugarhouses will open their doors to the public.  Even if you know how maple syrup is made – from tapping the sugar maples to boiling sap in an evaporator over a roaring hot fire – it is still a treat to visit a working sugarhouse and learn more about the process and meet the families who carry on this spring tradition every year.  More than 100 sugarhouses, across the state, will open their doors so that you can watch and sample their incredible products.  From different grades of syrup to melt-in-your-mouth maple candy, you will find the best and purest NH maple products at all these establishments.  We are lucky to have at least two working sugarhouses no more than 15 minutes away – Sunday Mountain Maple Farm and Mt. Cube Farm.  Most of the area’s eateries will have at least one menu item that will feature NH maple syrup and Breakfast on the Connecticut will join in as we feature Apple Cheddar Breakfast Bread Pudding with warm maple syrup.  So come and enjoy Maple Weekend in NH, stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, visit a sugarhouse and sample the first harbinger of spring.

Let It Snow – Storm Nemo 2013

February 13th, 2013 by donnanandersen

Snow Roller Used to Pack Snow to Make Roads Passable by Sleigh

Snow Roller Used to Pack Snow to Make Roads Passable by Sleigh  1850 – 1920

The entire northeast was just hit by Storm Nemo, a “Noreaster” that in some parts of Connecticut left 40 inches of new snow on the ground.  Travel became impossible and people stayed put in their homes waiting for the clean-up.  The pubic works departments were on the roads and within 24 hours after the storm, traffic, at least on the Interstates, could move again.  But if it is the late 1800s what do you do to make travel possible after snow has fallen?  You use a horse-drawn snow roller.  They were not standardize in size – they were as big or as small as their builder decided to make them. Some are four feet in diameter and have one drum, others are six feet (or more) in diameter and have two drums that are side-by-side. Some have an implement seat on a post for the driver, while others have a buckboard-type seat and/or a full-width platform on top. Some have a rear-mounted scraper that dresses the freshly-rolled snow. In short, a snow roller was as unique as the individual who constructed it.  They were pulled by teams of horses and used to pack down the snow so that people could travel by sleigh.  Their heyday was between 1850 – 1920 until gasoline powered trucks came into common use.  But I bet they were used in some remote places until the 1940s.   Lots of snow fell with Storm Nemo – enough to make a snow roller pretty ineffective!  But the snow did make all the ski areas, both downhill and cross-country, very happy.  Come north to New Hampshire, stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, and play in the snow!

The Holidays and Keeping Your Pets Safe

December 5th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Wolf

Wolf, Our Dog, In An Earlier Time – She is 19!

The holidays are a time of joy for families and included in your preparations you should eliminate the risk to beloved members of your family, your pets.  In our case, that would be our dogs, Wolf, Pola & Sparky and our cat, Rosie.   Holiday decorations can be a nightmare for your pets especially garland and wrapping ribbon.   Both can get stuck in a pet’s intestines necessitating surgical removal.  If cats gnaw on ribbon it can literally stitch the feline’s intestines together.  How about what your pet eats?  Turkey and ham are usually part of the holiday meal but the bones can be lodged in the intestines.  And rich foods, gravies can cause severe illness.  Many pets can get violently ill from drinking water from the Christmas tree stand – keep your beloved friends from the sap-filled water and heavy, rich treats.  Lastly, poinsettias are toxic to most household pets if they are chewed or swallowed in large enough quantities.  Instead of doing the math on that equation, chose other types of floral arrangements that are safe.  The best holiday gift you can give your pets is a safe and hazard-free environment so they can enjoy all the festivities with you.

If you are traveling with a pet, consider a stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut.  We have two pet-friendly rooms, Room 14 & 15.  We also have 23 acres – plenty of space to walk your dog for exercise.

The Christmas Revels 2012 – An Irish Celebration of the Winter Solstice December 13 – 16

December 4th, 2012 by donnanandersen

The Christmas Revels 2012

So, what is the solstice?  Well , in technical terms, it occurs when the sun appears at noon at its lowest altitude above the horizon.  In the Northern Hemisphere it occurs somewhere between December 20 – 21.  Interpretation of this event varies among cultures but here in the Upper Valley, we celebrate it with The Christmas Revels.  This year, 2012, it will be an Irish celebration, complete with music, dancing, singing and stories.

The setting is 1907, when immigration from Europe to the United States is at its peak.  The Irish are a major part of this relocation and with them they bring their unique culture complete with poetry, dance, music and their strong sense of survival and yearning for a new life in this land of opportunity.  The Christmas Revels put you on the deck of the Glenna Roy as the emigres create a memorable Christmas celebration at sea.  There is Irish dancing, fiddler Laura Fisk, a terrific ceilidh band and, of course, an Irish story or two.

For more information please visit The Christmas Revels.  See the performance, spend a night at Breakfast on the Connecticut and enjoy a wonderful breakfast the next morning.  Make some time to do some holiday shopping in the area and remember there is no sales tax!

 

Opera North Celebrates 30 Years

June 25th, 2012 by donnanandersen

The King and I, Opera North

The King and I, Opera North
August 3, 8, 11, 16 & 17, 2012

The Summer of 2012 will see Opera North celebrating its 30th year filled with magnificent voices, great music and lively theater.  The season is all about three charming operas and one classic American musical.

The Elixir of Love, Donizetti
Nemorino is head over heels in love with Adina.  He will try anything to make her return his affection, including spending his last dollar on a love potion.  The comedy will be sung in Italian with English subtitles.

The King and I, Rogers and Hammerstein
Anna Leonowens, an English schoolteacher sent to Siam to teach the children in the royal palace, clashes with their father, the King.  Together they find themselves bound by a love that neither is able to express.

The Impresario, Mozart
This is a hilarious opera about the classic conflict between singers and the theater manager who must cast them.

The Cunning Little Vixen, Janacek
This is a touching tale of the cycle of life in a European forest with characters as varied as the forest itself.

Tickets are on sale now at www.operanorth.org or by calling the Lebanon Opera House at 603-448-0400.  Make it a date night out with a dinner, a show and a stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut serving a wonderful breakfast the next morning.

 

Quinatucquet, The Great River

June 13th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Canoeing on the Connecticut River

Canoeing on the Connecticut River, "The Nile of New England"

Quinatucquet is a Native American word meaning “at the long estuary” and given to a body of water known as “the Nile of New England”.  Breakfast on the Connecticut sits on the banks of this river also the longest river in New England.  Yes, it is the Connecticut River flowing over 360 miles from the Canadian border to Long Island Sound.  Once described by the New York Times as ” the Nation’s best landscaped sewer”, the Connecticut River, through the passage of the Clean Water Act and the investment of millions of dollars from government and the private sector, has been reclaimed for our nation to explore and, better still, play in.  Along its banks there are large archeological sites, including one in Claremont NH settled by Native Americans around 800 AD.  There are ten bridges that traverse the Connecticut that are registered with the National Register of Historic Places including the Cornish-Windsor Bridge, the longest covered bridge in the United States.  About 20 miles after the Cornish-Windsor covered bridge you can glide by the Fort at #4 in Charlestown, NH where on an August morning in 1754 a band of Indians broke into the home of Captain James Johnson and took captive the Captain, his 24-year old pregnant wife and their three children, ages 6, 4 & 2 and set off on a trek to Canada.   The reclaimed Connecticut has once again become the life-line for commerce, agriculture, industry as well as energy production, irrigation, manufacturing and multiple recreational uses.  Ninety-nine cities, towns & villages border its length.  Thirty-five colleges and universities on its banks provide an unprecedented representation of higher learning.  Agriculture is still at work on 11% of the Connecticut’s land providing a ready source of locally grown foods.  You can swim – cross the Connecticut from bank to bank in many places and you have swum from NH to VT – fish and boat, best done by canoe, kayak or pontoon.  The Connecticut River and the Valley is one of the last water places that is still underdeveloped and wildly beautiful.  So come spend some time at Breakfast on the Connecticut, take a canoe out in the morning fog and experience the “mighty Connecticut, the first of America’s great rivers and in many ways the last.”

12 Orphaned Bear Cubs Are In The Care Of Lyme NH’s Bear Rehabilitator, Ben Kilham

May 25th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Black Bear Cubs

Black Bear Cubs Rescued And Now In The Care Of Bear Rehabilitation Expert, Ben Kilham Of Lyme, NH

Policemen aren’t the only mammals that like doughnuts!  NH Fish and Game  Officer, Chris Rines, was able to lure two orphaned bear cubs into a safe trap by using doughnuts soaked in half and half.  The bear cubs were rescued after their mother was struck and killed by a car on Route 25.  The cubs are about 5 months old and each weigh about 8-10 pounds.  They are now in the care of bear rehabilitation expert, Ben Kilham, an independent wildlife biologist of Lyme, NH.  Ben is a nationally recognized bear expert and author of “Among the Bears: Raising Orphan Cubs in the Wild”.  They are being held in a separate enclosure until they get their sea legs and then will join the other 10 cubs in an eight acre enclosed forest.  This has been an extraordinary year for orphaned cubs – some coming from their mothers being killed in car accidents others from mothers being shot by NH residents.  In a normal year, there would only be about 5-6 orphaned bear cubs.  The cubs will spend a year in the enclosed forest, socializing with the other bears before being released back to the wild in northern New Hampshire.  It costs about $1500 per year to rehabilitate a cub so if you would like to help monetarily you may send a donation Ben Kilham at PO Box 37, Lyme, NH  03768.   If you are a NH resident, New Hampshire Wildlife Services provides free electric fencing to protect property from bear intrusion.  Two years ago, we were saddened to find at the end of our driveway, a young bear cub killed by a motorist.  So as you travel NH’s rural roads and especially at night, drive slowly and safely being on the lookout for mother bear and her cubs as well as other wildlife.

6th Annual Secret Gardens of Corinth and Topsham

May 11th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Blake Memorial Library Secret Garden Tour, Corinth VT

Are you a garden enthusiast?  With the advent of the GPS, can you still read a map?  If the answer to both is in the affirmative then the 6th Annual Secret Gardens of Corinth and Topsham was designed for you.  It is billed by the organizers as  “down-to-earth ” because it will take you along the back roads of east central Vermont.  The Tour is sponsored by the Blake Memorial Library of Corinth.  The organizers maintain that the secret gardens may be unassuming but each will take your breath away because of design, gardening style and landscaping techniques.  First though, you have to find the gardens, and that is, in and of itself, the challenge.  Tickets for the Tour are $20 on the day of the event, Saturday, June 30, 2012 or $15 in advance.  The ticket will provide a map and a description of each of the five gardens you’ll be visiting.  Give yourself three to four hours to enjoy the tour, which starts at 12 and ends at 5 p.m.  Stay overnight at Breakfast on the Connecticut, enjoy a wonderful breakfast and spend the afternoon enjoying the discovery of Mother Nature’s beauty, albeit helped along by mere mortals.