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Archive for the ‘Spring Events’ Category

Baby Animal Day – Billings Farm, Woodstock, VT

April 5th, 2014 by donnanandersen

Baby Calf at Billings Farm

Baby Calf at Billings Farm

Babies are a little bit of heaven on earth and there is nothing sweeter than the smell of a baby after a bath.  And as our babies grow they are fascinated by the babies in the animal kingdom.  So the cutest day of the year in the Upper Valley is Baby Animal Day at the Billings Farm in Woodstock, VT.  You get to see up close newborn lambs, calves, ducklings, chicks and more.  There are children oriented crafts and, of course, wagon rides.  What an incredible way for children to welcome spring and the rebirth of the world around them.  Especially after this winter that didn’t want to end.  Mark your calendars – April 19, 2014, 10:00 am – 3:30 pm at the Billings Farm, Woodstock, VT.

Sunday Mountain Maple Farm – Carlisle Trophy 2012

April 6th, 2013 by donnanandersen

Sunday Mountain Maple Farm, Orford, New Hampshire

Sunday Mountain Maple Farm, Orford, New Hampshire

We all know what a Blue Ribbon or Best in Show means at the County Fair.  Well in the world of  maple syrup, in the state of New Hampshire, the Carlisle Trophy is the coveted prize.  For the second year in a row the Sunday Mountain Maple Farm, in Orford, NH, has received the Carlisle Trophy for New Hampshire’s best maple syrup for the 2012 crop.  Analyzed for clarity, taste & purity, Sunday Mountain’s sample came out on top.   The Sunday Mountain Maple Farm, a New Hampshire Farm of Distinction, is owned and operated by Paul and Betty Messer.  In addition to 200 taps behind his sugar house, he has 3000 taps located on Cube Mountain.   He can been seen even in coldest months working on the tubing that delivers the sap to holding tanks.  We are very lucky here at Breakfast on the Connecticut to be only a few miles from Sunday Mountain.  We use only their syrup at breakfast on our pancakes, waffles, french toast and Apple Cheddar Breakfast Bread Pudding.   After you have enjoyed our breakfast why not stop by Sunday Mountain and pick up a container, or two, of their award winning maple syrup.  You can’t get any better than maple syrup as a “farm to table” experience.

Dartmouth Pow-Wow – May 11 & 12, 2013

April 5th, 2013 by donnanandersen

Dartmouth Pow-Wow

Dartmouth Pow-Wow

Dartmouth College was first established in 1769 “for the education of Youth of the Indian tribes… English Youth and any others.”  In the first 200 years of existence only 19 Native Americans graduated from Dartmouth.  That changed in the 1970s with President Kemeny and to date more than 700 Native Americans have attended Dartmouth from more than 200 different tribes.  The Dartmouth Pow-Wow serves as an opportunity for members of both the Dartmouth and Upper Valley communities to observe, participate and learn from a broad representation of Native American music, arts and crafts.  Bring the family and look for the three key elements:
Drum Group
They, a group of 10, sing the first song each day sometimes viewed as an opening prayer.
Woman Dancer
She is appointed to lead all dancers in and out of the dancing arena at the start and the end of the Pow-Wow.  Her appointment is based on experience and age.
Male Dancer
He, along with the Head Woman Dancer, leads the contestants in the Grand Entry at the beginning of the Pow-Wow.

What a special event to attend over the Mothers’ Day Weekend!  Stay in a Deluxe Room at Breakfast on the Connecticut, enjoy a sumptuous breakfast and then head over to the Green in Hanover where your senses will be assailed by the wonderful sights, sounds and smells of the Dartmouth Pow-Wow.

 

Hanover, NH – Lucky Number 13 In America’s Best Small Towns

April 1st, 2013 by donnanandersen

South Main Street - Hanover, NH

South Main Street – Hanover, NH

The Smithsonian Magazine has compiled a list of the 20 Best Towns To Visit in 2013 and Hanover, NH ranks as LUCKY 13.  Towns in the running had to have a population of less than 15,000 and a significant concentration of music, the arts, historic sites and other cultural attractions.  And it didn’t hurt to have an institution of higher learning nearby.  So why Hanover, NH?  Let’s start with Dartmouth College, founded in 1769 to train Native Americans as missionaries.  It has become one of the most prestigious current Ivy League educational institutions.  There is music, theater, museums, art galleries – some associated with the college and others in the surrounding communities.  The Orozco murals, located in Baker Library, has just received the National Landmark designation and last year the Dartmouth Aires came in second on NBC’s The Sing-Off.  You can shop at quaint bookstores, eat at restaurants that pride themselves on their farm to table offerings, canoe or kayak on the Connecticut River, ski on the hills of NH & VT and,if you are so inclined, hike a segment of the Appalachian Trail.  We feel the air is cleaner, the grass is greener and the water is purer.  And if that is not enough, then how about the Enfield Shaker Museum, the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum or the Saint Gaudens National Historic Site?  So set your sights on a visit to the Upper Connecticut River Valley, stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut and enjoy the ambiance of a stay in one of America’s best small towns.

Orozco Murals Now A National Historic Landmark

March 27th, 2013 by donnanandersen

Jose Clemente Orozco's The Epic of American Civilization

Jose Clemente Orozco’s The Epic of American Civilization

On March 11, 2013 the Secretary of the Interior designated the Orozco Murals one of 13 new National Historic Landmarks.  National historic landmarks are nationally significant historic places that possess exceptional value or quality in illustrating or interpreting the heritage of the United States.  Jose Clemente Orozco was an srtist in-residence at Dartmouth between 1932 and 1934.  It was during this time he created The Epic of American Civilization, comprised of 24 individual panels or “scenes” that span approximately 3200 square feet.  The Orozco mural is housed in the former reserve corridor of Baker Library now called the Orozco Room.   This is a can’t miss treasure when visiting Dartmouth College.  Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, visit the Orozco exhibit and in your travels don’t forget the Hood Museum.

King Bird Sanctuary

March 10th, 2013 by donnanandersen

hanover conservancySince 1961 the Hanover Conservancy has created, maintained and managed a series of trails in the Upper Valley.  Trails such as Balch Hill, Mink Brook and Greensboro Ridge have been enjoyed by so many Upper Valley residents and visitors.  In June 2011, another property came into being – the Nan & Allen King Bird Sanctuary.  The land was once pasture for the Hayes Farm and can be reached by parking at the Etna Library, walking across a field to enter, hiking a mowed trail and coming to rest on a stone bench in the meadow.  You will enjoy a view over the Mink Brook valley while you sit and (if you brought one) eat your picnic lunch.  Make sure you stop to identify crabapple, hawthorn or nannyberry just to mention a few.  We will give you a card with all 8 flowering bushes that are there.  And don’t forget the birds – you may see a Black-and-White Warbler, a Common Yellowthroat or maybe even the seldom seen Wilson’s Warbler.  The days are getting warmer and spring fever will hit and you will want to smell the fresh air and feel the warmth of the spring sun on your face.  Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, have a great breakfast and then take a sandwich and explore the King Bird Sanctuary.  It doesn’t get any better than that!

Quinatucquet, The Great River

June 13th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Canoeing on the Connecticut River

Canoeing on the Connecticut River, "The Nile of New England"

Quinatucquet is a Native American word meaning “at the long estuary” and given to a body of water known as “the Nile of New England”.  Breakfast on the Connecticut sits on the banks of this river also the longest river in New England.  Yes, it is the Connecticut River flowing over 360 miles from the Canadian border to Long Island Sound.  Once described by the New York Times as ” the Nation’s best landscaped sewer”, the Connecticut River, through the passage of the Clean Water Act and the investment of millions of dollars from government and the private sector, has been reclaimed for our nation to explore and, better still, play in.  Along its banks there are large archeological sites, including one in Claremont NH settled by Native Americans around 800 AD.  There are ten bridges that traverse the Connecticut that are registered with the National Register of Historic Places including the Cornish-Windsor Bridge, the longest covered bridge in the United States.  About 20 miles after the Cornish-Windsor covered bridge you can glide by the Fort at #4 in Charlestown, NH where on an August morning in 1754 a band of Indians broke into the home of Captain James Johnson and took captive the Captain, his 24-year old pregnant wife and their three children, ages 6, 4 & 2 and set off on a trek to Canada.   The reclaimed Connecticut has once again become the life-line for commerce, agriculture, industry as well as energy production, irrigation, manufacturing and multiple recreational uses.  Ninety-nine cities, towns & villages border its length.  Thirty-five colleges and universities on its banks provide an unprecedented representation of higher learning.  Agriculture is still at work on 11% of the Connecticut’s land providing a ready source of locally grown foods.  You can swim – cross the Connecticut from bank to bank in many places and you have swum from NH to VT – fish and boat, best done by canoe, kayak or pontoon.  The Connecticut River and the Valley is one of the last water places that is still underdeveloped and wildly beautiful.  So come spend some time at Breakfast on the Connecticut, take a canoe out in the morning fog and experience the “mighty Connecticut, the first of America’s great rivers and in many ways the last.”

12 Orphaned Bear Cubs Are In The Care Of Lyme NH’s Bear Rehabilitator, Ben Kilham

May 25th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Black Bear Cubs

Black Bear Cubs Rescued And Now In The Care Of Bear Rehabilitation Expert, Ben Kilham Of Lyme, NH

Policemen aren’t the only mammals that like doughnuts!  NH Fish and Game  Officer, Chris Rines, was able to lure two orphaned bear cubs into a safe trap by using doughnuts soaked in half and half.  The bear cubs were rescued after their mother was struck and killed by a car on Route 25.  The cubs are about 5 months old and each weigh about 8-10 pounds.  They are now in the care of bear rehabilitation expert, Ben Kilham, an independent wildlife biologist of Lyme, NH.  Ben is a nationally recognized bear expert and author of “Among the Bears: Raising Orphan Cubs in the Wild”.  They are being held in a separate enclosure until they get their sea legs and then will join the other 10 cubs in an eight acre enclosed forest.  This has been an extraordinary year for orphaned cubs – some coming from their mothers being killed in car accidents others from mothers being shot by NH residents.  In a normal year, there would only be about 5-6 orphaned bear cubs.  The cubs will spend a year in the enclosed forest, socializing with the other bears before being released back to the wild in northern New Hampshire.  It costs about $1500 per year to rehabilitate a cub so if you would like to help monetarily you may send a donation Ben Kilham at PO Box 37, Lyme, NH  03768.   If you are a NH resident, New Hampshire Wildlife Services provides free electric fencing to protect property from bear intrusion.  Two years ago, we were saddened to find at the end of our driveway, a young bear cub killed by a motorist.  So as you travel NH’s rural roads and especially at night, drive slowly and safely being on the lookout for mother bear and her cubs as well as other wildlife.

6th Annual Secret Gardens of Corinth and Topsham

May 11th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Blake Memorial Library Secret Garden Tour, Corinth VT

Are you a garden enthusiast?  With the advent of the GPS, can you still read a map?  If the answer to both is in the affirmative then the 6th Annual Secret Gardens of Corinth and Topsham was designed for you.  It is billed by the organizers as  “down-to-earth ” because it will take you along the back roads of east central Vermont.  The Tour is sponsored by the Blake Memorial Library of Corinth.  The organizers maintain that the secret gardens may be unassuming but each will take your breath away because of design, gardening style and landscaping techniques.  First though, you have to find the gardens, and that is, in and of itself, the challenge.  Tickets for the Tour are $20 on the day of the event, Saturday, June 30, 2012 or $15 in advance.  The ticket will provide a map and a description of each of the five gardens you’ll be visiting.  Give yourself three to four hours to enjoy the tour, which starts at 12 and ends at 5 p.m.  Stay overnight at Breakfast on the Connecticut, enjoy a wonderful breakfast and spend the afternoon enjoying the discovery of Mother Nature’s beauty, albeit helped along by mere mortals.

Upper Valley’s Greensboro Ridge Natural Area

May 8th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Grennsboro Ridge Vernal Pool

Greensboro Ridge Vernal Pool

A special Upper Valley treat can be found at the Hanover Conservancy’s Greensboro Ridge Natural Area.  This is a 113 – acre protected property home to numerous wildflowers not to mention barred owls, broad-winged hawks, ruffed grouse as well as warblers, vireos and numerous other small birds.  The ledges and stone ridges are also home to bear, mink, fisher, raccoon, deer and fox.  Keep your eyes peeled for the tracks as you walk along the trail.  Harder to find are the natural area’s nine vernal pools which are necessary breeding grounds for salamanders and frogs.  To reach Greensboro Ridge, take Route 10 to Route 120.  Turn left onto Greensboro Road and left  to Velvet Rocks Drive and park at the trailhead at the top of the drive.  Find a trail map at Greensboro Ridge.  This is a well kept Upper Valley secret and May & June are a great time to explore it.