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Archive for the ‘Spring Events’ Category

Take A Tour Of Lyme Center, NH

May 8th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Lyme Center Academy Building

Lyme Center Adademy Building - Home of the Historical Society

About 7 miles from Breakfast on the Connecticut is the distinctive village of Lyme Center and their historic district.

Start with the Dimick House on Dorchester Road which was mail ordered from Sears in 1924 at a cost of $2,473.  It is a two-story frame and clapboard structure and one of the last houses to use sawn lumber from Sanborn Mill.  Just a note – this is a private home and not open for touring.

Other interesting buildings include the Lyme Center Baptist Church (1830), the Lyme Center Store (1876) and the Lyme Center Academy (1839) that houses the local historical society known as the Lyme Historians.  The museum is open on Tuesday from 9 – noon.  A tour booklet is available for a modest charge from the Lyme Historians.

The Beal House, also on Dorchester Road, has two granite steps with bootscrapers, built into the steps, at the entrance.

Interested in decorative moldings?  Houses on Dorchester Road have cyma recta (double curvature), ovolo (convex hollow round) and cavetto (hollow rounds with an Egyptian influence) all under projecting eaves.

Please take notice of the black locust and sugar maples.  They provide shade for Lyme Center and help to unify this small village.

Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut and explore Lyme Center while on your way to the Dartmouth Skiway, either for hiking, in spring, summer or fall or skiing in the winter.

Kayaking 101

May 5th, 2012 by donnanandersen

Kayaking on Storrs Pond

Kayaking on Storrs Pond

It’s a glorious summer day, the sun is shining, the sky is blue and it’s the weekend.  You want to get out and have some fun.  It’s the perfect type of day to be outside, commune with nature, paddle a kayak around a lake – but you don’t know how.  You are in luck because LL Bean’s Kayak Discovery Series allows you to walk into the West Lebanon, NH store and sign-up for an hour-and-a-half kayak instruction for $20 on Storrs Pond in Hanover, NH.  LL Bean will supply the kayak, the paddle, the PFD, and take care of all your personal valuables.  Class size ranges from 1 to 14 people and there are typically two instructors per class.  The class consists of 20 – 30 minutes of dry land instruction, including determining who goes into which boat, what paddle size is needed, securing PFDs (personal flotation device), as well as instruction on how to hold the paddle and paddling techniques.  Students will then hit the water in their kayaks for an hour of paddling around on Storrs Pond.  LL Bean’s Discovery Series runs through Saturdays from May 26 to September 22 from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and on Sundays from July 1 through August 26 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  What do you have to lose?  Be prepared to get a little wet.

Long River Studios – Filled With Treasures

November 8th, 2011 by donnanandersen

Long River Studio Celebrates 20 Years

Long River Studios Celebrates 20 Years

Located on Main Street in Lyme, NH, Long River Studios sits filled with the creative offerings of local artists & crafters.  A volunteer-run cooperative, Long River was formed in 1991 to try to connect local artists & crafters with the local community and help them make a living.  Currently, Long River represents 75 artists and crafts people from a wide sampling of medium.  Within its walls, you will find sculpture, photography, jewelry, needlework, painting and basketry just to highlight a few.  Long River Studios is open year round and hosts three annual exhibits.  Long River Studios is one of the focal points for the village of Lyme and once though its doors you get a feel for the New Hampshire region known as the Upper Valley.  If you stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut stop by Long River and pick up that one of a kind holiday gift.

The “Robot Zoo” At the Montshire Museum of Science

June 15th, 2011 by donnanandersen

The Robot Zoo - Chameleon

The Robot Zoo at The Montshire Museum of Science - Chameleon

The “Robot Zoo” , a nationally touring exhibition, reveals the magic of nature as a master engineer.  Visit the Montshire Museum and explore the bio-mechanics of complex animal robots to discover how real animals work.  The robot animals and hands-on activities illustrate fascinating real-life characteristics of animals, such as how a chameleon changes colors and how a fly walks on the ceiling.  After exploring the robots you can go outside to the Science Park and float balls down The Rill, immerse yourself in the Water Dance exhibit and make amazing shapes with water at Water Bells.  The new Hughes Pavilion overlooking the Science Park offer visitors a respite from sun or showers and is the perfect place to have lunch.  Bring a picnic or purchase lunch from the King Arthur Flour bakers.  No longer do you need to leave the museum for lunch – King Arthur Flour’s offerings will include sandwiches, fruit, granola bars, chips, ice cream, cookies and cold beverages.  So stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut and take one day to explore the wonders of the Montshire – but don’t forget the towels (we will supply those), swimsuits and sunscreen!

31 Sites on the Upper Valley Section of the Connecticut River Birding Trail

June 15th, 2011 by donnanandersen

Hermit Thrush

Hermit Thrush

Welcome to the Connecticut River Birding Trail, especially the Upper Valley Section.  The CRBT is dedicated to the conservation of wildlife and their natural habitats.  There are 31 sites on the Upper Valley section of the Connecticut River Birding Trail, each with its own personality and wonderful natural attributes.  Lyme, the home of Breakfast on the Connecticut, has three sites: The Pinnacle, The Chaffee Wildlife Management Area and Hewes Brook Wetland along the Appalachian Trail.  All three of these areas have well-defined trails through a variety of terrain.  All are very productive birding areas and can be accessed best spring through fall.  The Birding Trail is a non-profit conservation-education initiative – their philosophy is that the more people get out and enjoy the land, the more they will respect natural areas and the wonders they highlight.  It is their hope that with increased involvement in, and appreciation for, natural landscapes, the public will be inspired to conserve and protect these and other special places, now and in the future.  Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut and if you decide to explore sites on the CRBT we will give you a map that outlines all 31 sites.

10 River Towns Along the Connecticut River Byway

June 1st, 2011 by donnanandersen

Connecticut River Byways

Connecticut River Byways

“Connecticut” comes from the Abenaki word “Quinnetukut” which means “Long River”.  Begining its journey in the far northern reaches of New Hampshire in a chain of lakes emerging from a high elevation beaver pond and ending at Long Island Sound, the Connecticut River unites New Hampshire and Vermont for over half its 410-mile length.  The history of New England’s longest and most powerful river goes all the way back to the time of glaciers, the Abenaki living on its banks and to the colonial settlements whose architecture can still be seen in many of the Connecticut River Valley’s villages and towns.    It is the flow of people, commerce and culture that has characterized the history of the river.  Ten river towns , strung like pearls along the Connecticut River Byway in Vermont and New Hampshire, offer traveler information and services.  At the Waypoint Welcome Centers of Brattleboro, Bellows Falls, Windsor, White River Junction, Wells River and St. Johnsbury, all in Vermont and Claremont, Woodsville, Lancaster, and Colebrook, all in New Hampshire, you will discover the special natural, cultural, historical, and recreational attractions of the regions served by each welcome center.  Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut and ask for one of the Byway maps to begin to connect with the heart of New England.

New Hampshie Covered Bridges – Lyme’s Own Edgell Covered Bridge

May 25th, 2011 by donnanandersen

Edgell Covered Bridge

EDgell Covered Bridge, River Road, Lyme, NH

Covered bridges are placed throughout the state of New Hampshire.  “Kissing Bridges” as some affectionately call them are unique unto themselves.  They can reflect the town that they reside in, the artist or architect that designed them, and even the period that they were built in.  A picturesque New England Covered Bridge is more than just beautiful, covered bridges are practical and why our forefathers built them.  They provide a great place to walk in from the sun, to hide from the rain and to look down at the water that passes below.  Covered bridges also protect the structure from the harsh northern New England winters.  Breakfast on the Connecticut is less than a mile from the Edgell Covered Bridge that spans Clay Brook which feeds into the Connecticut River.  You can reach it in one of two ways – put on those sneakers and take a walk to the bridge and back.  What a great way to get in some exercise before breakfast!  Or, put on those sneakers and take out one of or canoes paddling to the bridge – you can go under the bridge and explore the large pools of water that make up Clay Brook.  And don’t forget to bestow that kiss on your significant other!  For many years we had our children convinced that the horn of the car would sound every time we passed through a covered bridge – they eventually discovered the slight of hand but they asked us to continue with their children.  Covered bridges are magical places.

Holt’s Ledge, One Of Over 50 Upper Valley Hiking Highlights

May 24th, 2011 by donnanandersen

View From Hol's Ledge

Sunset From Holt's Ledge

Located in Lyme, Holts Ledge is an easy dayhike  of 2.2 miles roundtrip.  Holts Ledge is a precipitous cliff with fine views to the east.  The cliff edge is fenced off not only to protect unaware hikers on foggy days, but also to protect the peregrine falcons who nest on the cliff.  Before being protected by the Endangered Species Act, peregrines were driven out of New England by the ravages of DDT, which thinned their egg shells and caused the eggs to break before the chicks were mature enough to survive.  Holt’s Ledge was one of the first sites in New Hampshire where peregrines were successfully reintroduced.  The gentler northern slope of Holt’s Ledge is home to the Dartmouth Skiway. and also the route of this dayhike.  Breakfast on the Connecticut is 7 miles from the Skiway and Holt’s Ledge.  You will travel east from Route 10 on Lyme-Dorchester Road to the parking lot of the Dartmouth Skiway, which is also the trail head.   If given advance notice and for a small fee, Breakfast on the Connecticut will pack a picnic that can be enjoyed on this outstanding dayhike.

15th Anniversary Of Lyme Creamery Antiques In 2011

May 14th, 2011 by donnanandersen

Lyme Creamery Antiques

Lyme Creamery Antiques

2011 marks 123 years since the establishment of the Creamery in Lyme, which served the community and surrounding area until 1958.  2011 also marks the 15th Anniversary of Lyme Creamery Antiques, which opened for the first time on May 24, 1996.  They will be celebrating on that day this year and all year long.  They will be serving ice cream for 15 days beginning on May 24th and continuing daily through June 7.  Except for those 15 days, when they will be open every day, they will continue their scheduled opening days of Friday, Saturday and Sunday – 11 to 5, beginning on May 13.  They do have a program called the Antique Buyers’ Club with earned credit balances being carried forward from last year at 50%. In recognition of this year’s anniversary all discounts with the Antique Buyers’ Club will start at the 15% level.  Stay at Breakfast on the Connecticut, have a wonderful breakfast and then visit the Lyme Creamery Antiques, about 4 miles away.

100th Anniversary of the Weeks Act Including The White Mountain National Forest

May 14th, 2011 by donnanandersen

Fall Foliage Along 112 ner Kancamagus Highway

Fall Foliage Along Route 112 Near The Kancamagus Highway

A hundred years ago, the White Mountains region in New Hampshire was a different sight.  Hundreds of photographs and articles depict a region of mountain sides stripped of trees, streams choked with silt from eroding hillsides and ash from forest fires falling on nearby towns.  There used to be whole towns, hundreds of mills, dozens of mines, quarries, charcoal and lime kilns and much, much more.  Today’s visitors to the White Mountain region see acres and acres of healthy green forest because of the enactment of the 1911 Weeks Act which enabled the acquisition of over 19 million acres in 124 national forests, spanning 42 states and including the New Hampshire White Mountain National Forest.  In many ways, New Hampshire considers the Weeks Act as “our” National Forest law because the White Mountain National Forest was the first of the eastern National Forest Reserves.  Where would we be without the scenic views of Pinkham Notch, Franconia Notch, The Basin and the Kancamagus Highway?  According to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, almost 51% of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail passes through lands administered by the United States Agriculture Service.  Of those lands, the Weeks Act had a major impact on the 2,000-plus mile trail seen as a national treasure.  A short 25 minute drive from Breakfast on the Connecticut will get you to the White Mountain National Forest.  Once there, you will travel slowly as the next turn always has another spectacular view.  Log on to www.weekslegacy.org to look at all the activities that are planned to celebrate this milestone.